Banks Power

BANKS RAM-AIR INTAKE SYSTEM 2004-08 FORD F150 5.4L

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Banks Ram-Air® Intake System

Emissions compliant: CARB E.O. D-161-84

5.4L V-8 engine only
Banks opens up your truck's breathing with a flowbench-developed and dyno-proven Ram-Air Intake System with a High-Ram intake plenum that outflows the stock setup by up to 63%. Ram-Air's lifetime filter has a huge outlet ... deep filter pleats that maximize flow ... a wide-open, streamlined design ... and a complete air filter housing that draws in cool, under-vehicle air. Banks delivers cooler, denser air to the engine for greater power.

Overview Summary

We measured each intake’s effect on air density at the turbo compressor inlet. Intake temperatures will generally be higher than ambient conditions, but the more the system can duct cool air to the filter and preserve the cool temperature as the air is ducted to the turbo, the higher the air density will be. In addition, there will commonly be a pressure drop as air travels through the filter and the ducting due to any restriction that is introduced. If the design of the system can minimize the restriction and the pressure loss, air density will be preserved.

Test Setup

A 2004 Dodge Ram 2500 4X4 Quad Cab Long Bed with the Cummins 5.9L engine and automatic transmission was used as the test vehicle. A data acquisition system was used to measure vehicle speed via GPS, along with multiple temperature thermistors and extremely accurate pressure transducers. The total vehicle weight was approximately 19,000 lbs. Tests were run in 2WD.

Testing was conducted on a moderate hill on the northbound CA-57 in the city of Pomona. Speed was maintained at 45 MPH until the vehicle was adjacent to a pre-determined start point on the road. At that point, the accelerator was fully depressed and the vehicle was allowed to accelerate while climbing the hill. Test data was observed at the same vehicle speed in all cases, with the engine at 2800 RPM, the point of peak engine power. This data point occurred between 60 and 90 seconds into the run—sufficient time to allow the engine to reach a stabilized operating condition.

Data Acquisition

Vehicle Speed, Engine RPM and Accelerator Pedal Position were logged to determine the load conditions and speeds. Temperature was measured using thermistors for increased accuracy. They were mounted to measure ambient temperature as well as temperatures at the filter and compressor inlets. Pressure transducers were used to measure pressure in the same locations. The intake system effect on air density was evaluated by comparing the temperature and pressure of the ambient air condition with the temperature and pressure of the air at the turbo compressor inlet.

All intake filtering systems will have some effect of diminished air density from ambient, including stock. The purpose of this evaluation is to compare this effect in relationship to the stock system. A replacement intake system is only valuable and effective if the intake air density percentage vs. ambient is greater than the air density percentage offered by the stock system.

All data presented assumes an ambient temperature of 77°F and ambient pressure of 29.24 inches of mercury, per SAE standards.